How do i use reverb when mixing music as a dj?

Another great way to use reverb is, instead of just dry-mixing directly on the next track, to make the incoming song match the beat. But it adds the reverb to the rhythm of the outgoing track, since you incorporate the new dry track.

How do i use reverb when mixing music as a dj?

Another great way to use reverb is, instead of just dry-mixing directly on the next track, to make the incoming song match the beat. But it adds the reverb to the rhythm of the outgoing track, since you incorporate the new dry track. The reverb effect has an added function. The higher the intensity, the more distance you create from the sound.

This can not only be applied to blur a track, but also to blur an incoming track, since the effect can be applied to make it sound distant and, at the same time, reduce the effect and bring it closer. Spring reverberations usually have a bright, dynamic, and slightly metallic sound, making them ideal for adding a short, clumsy sound to guitars and vocals. However, in the case of digital reverbs, one of the first things you'll need to adjust is the algorithm, which allows you to choose what type of reverb you want to use. Now that you know how to control a reverb add-on, let's look at some tips for using reverb in your mixes.

The effects provide DJs with endless creative opportunities and the possibility to create a unique and distinctive style for their mixes. Now that you have a basic understanding of how reverb works, let's take a look at the different types of reverbs you like to use when recording or mixing. Some reverbs also include additional controls to further improve the sound, such as specific high-pass and low-pass filters, or diffusion controls, which control how quickly the original signal goes from initial reflections to full reverb. Shorter rooms tend to sound better in fast-paced songs, while longer reverb times work better when there's enough time between hits to hear the decay.

This effect is ideal for use at the end of the original track, as it allows reverb to be maintained indefinitely until the effect is deactivated. If you want to add reverb to a track but don't want to delay it too much in the mix, turn on the pre-delay. To achieve this effect, it is best to create a new auxiliary track with a type of reverb and send each instrument to the reverb bus at different levels. Try reducing the bass and treble to make the reverb sound less subtle, or increase the treble to make them shine and stand out.

Thanks to their intense sound and long decay times, hall reverberations usually work well on drums and other percussion instruments. This makes chamber reverbs a great option when you want reverb to form an important part of an instrument's sound, without ruining the rest of the mix, as hall reverbs usually do. After raising the attenuator, gradually turn the low-pass filter to the 12 o'clock position and you'll start to notice the high frequencies reflected in your mix. Applying the echo effect to the drums, for example, will begin to create a roll effect, which is ideal for artificially creating drum rolls and intensifying the build-up in the mix while you prepare for the incoming track.

In this blog, you'll learn everything you need to know to start adding depth and space to your mixes, and you'll learn how to use reverb like a pro.

Eva Prus
Eva Prus

Incurable bacon expert. Hardcore bacon nerd. Extreme coffee fan. Avid music aficionado. Professional internet junkie.

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