What is the best way to learn how to use turntables as a dj?

It's also important to have the right equipment. It's also important to have the right equipment, such as good turntables and the right pair of headphones, so you can hear the next song properly and move smoothly from one song to the next.

What is the best way to learn how to use turntables as a dj?

It's also important to have the right equipment. It's also important to have the right equipment, such as good turntables and the right pair of headphones, so you can hear the next song properly and move smoothly from one song to the next. You should also keep your discs clean so that they don't jump on you during the set. Collective co-founder Daisy O'Dell points out that the Technics SL-1200MK7 is among “the favorites of today's DJs”.

This direct drive model is highly prized among professional DJs and audiophiles for its precise motor control, its responsiveness to scratches and other styles, its ability to easily invert records, and other high-performance features. Due to their popularity, SL-1200MK7 turntables are somewhat difficult to come by (at the time of writing, they are out of stock on Amazon). However, we were able to find some examples used on eBay, which is probably the best thing for you. If you're looking for DJ turntables on a tight budget, get two of these affordable, high-quality Pioneer PLX-1000s.

The roulette's high-torque direct drive motor offers smooth audio quality, and its old-school design ensures accessibility for beginners. You also have extensive tempo control for different speeds and tones, which means you can achieve that squirrel sample sound in the style of the Kanye of yesteryear. Another great disc player for beginner DJ sessions is this Audio-Technica AT-LP140XP-BK. It includes a high-torque direct drive servo motor, a hydraulic swivel arm, and a stable die-cast aluminum tray.

All of this works to produce high-quality sound no matter what type of music you're playing. Once you've learned to identify good spots, a good way to keep track of them is to mark them on the vinyl. When you first learn how to scratch, it feels a little uncomfortable and you may not intuitively know how to do it. Although it's more difficult and no longer necessary, learning old-school DJ techniques has some definite benefits.

Even if you normally mix with controllers and a laptop, learning to use a record player can add a new layer of sound to your setup and can be useful depending on the type of concert you're playing. Not only will you have access to a variety of different digital tools and functions, but your setup will generally be easier to move compared to a turntable based setup. Third, once you've learned how to set your first beat correctly, you'll want to spend quite a bit of time matching the rhythms. You should practice with old vinyl, especially at first, since you don't want to damage your good records while you learn to scratch.

Some modern DJs may think that scratching and spinning a record player is just another type of old-fashioned technology, but there are plenty of reasons why you should learn how to spin this way. Like any other new skill you're trying to learn, to master scratch you'll have to spend a lot of time practicing. An important part of learning to scratch is learning to stop vinyl with your fingertips to prevent it from scratching. Authentic vinyl is a pleasure and not only does it have the best sound, but it also helps you learn the basics of DJing without having to use 20 shortcuts.

That means you'll have to learn how to do it yourself, and the easiest way to learn is to play with tracks in the same genre and rhythm structure. When you have a couple of records that share the same genre and rhythm, you'll want to start learning how to set your first beat. Next, we'll go through the different steps you need to follow with the turntable and mixer to play vinyl records properly, so that, in the end, you can get on any set of vinyl records and play vinyl records like an expert.

Eva Prus
Eva Prus

Incurable bacon expert. Hardcore bacon nerd. Extreme coffee fan. Avid music aficionado. Professional internet junkie.

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